Mr. Richard Hollant

About Me

Designer supporting social profit orgs and corporations committed to bettering communities.

Member Since October 2005
Member Type Sustaining
AIGA Chapter Connecticut
Title principal / design director
Company co:lab
Email moc.cnibaloc@hcir
Website colabinc.com
Field Brand and identity
Interaction design
Design/Graphic design
Bio Rich Hollant is the principal, strategist, and design director at CO:LAB in Connecticut, a firm he started In 1988. After nearly two decades developing brand and product launches for Fortune 500 corporations, he now works exclusively on initiatives with social value that are in the public interest. An interdisciplinary major from Boston University and a media major from the Museum School of Fine Arts, Hollant’s approach blends comprehensive strategic thinking with tightly orchestrated execution. Hollant has been featured in Business Weekly and Communications Arts, and was named one of GDUSA’s 20 People to Watch and by Fast Company as one of the top 11 designers creating social value. He’s a past president of AIGA Connecticut and current member of AIGA’s national board of directors.
  • Richard authored "Working for Social Profit: Six Tips"
  • Richard Hollant commented on the article "Racial Justice by Design"

    Clay— thanks for your post. However let's not get too far ahead of ourselves. The process we are laying out is one that is familiar to community organizers, civic engagers, and design thinkers. Step one: collect personal stories. If you have a personal story to share, Clay, we've supplied an avenue to do so. Every story should be heard. Every single one. Please do share—I would benefit from your personal story that prompted such a strong response. Step two: Town Hall... let's start to talk to each other without assumptions of outcome. That's solid design process! Join on the call on Tuesday. If you are having reservations about the trajectory of the dialogue—be there to let the organization know. And push up the comments you agree with. I can assure you this—the conversation will stay open and be productive if we all avoid making assumptions about each other's intentions. I don't see that AIGA has expressed and interest in advocating for preferential treatment for any one. I look forward to hearing from you on Tuesday.

  • Richard Hollant commented on the article "Racial Justice by Design"

    Thanks for sharing your background, Willhemina. There are a lot of initiatives in AIGA where you can get involved. We'd welcome your knowledge and experience!

  • Richard Hollant commented on the article "Racial Justice by Design"

    Everyone is welcome...everyone!

  • Richard Hollant commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3082&id=2096"

    Hi Ric: We met at the leadership retreat and this kind of messaging is exactly the kind of thoughtful, heartful comments I've come to appreciate from AIGA. I'm a designer who was born in Haiti. We've had a loss close to our family in the aftermath of the quake a few weeks ago. I'm getting daily info from relatives in Haiti regarding how awful things really are. As a people, I would characterize Haitians as a hopeful group—a spiritual group. Positive messages of support mean a lot to us. As we focus attention on rebuilding and fund-raising and aid dispensing, let's also remember to send communications of empathy and warmth. I know the people on that island cherish those sentiments—they've seen us through a lot. On a pragmatic basis, there are issues of exploitation that are starting to occur. In NYC, Haitians who are filing for the extension of temporary residency (fees waived by the Gov) are being charged outrageous fees for "processing and handling" by non-government profiteers. These victims, who typically don't speak english and have a fear of enforcement / authority are faced with the misrepresented dilemma of coming up with thousands of dollars to have simple files submitted for them or face deportation back to a ravaged country. This is a media and mass-communications issue that is right in the AIGA wheel-house. I'd be happy to work with/connect anyone with the ability to bring some focus to this aspect of the second wave of the quake aftermath. rich@colabinc.com

  • Richard Hollant commented on the article "Racial Justice by Design"

    Clay— thanks for your post. However let's not get too far ahead of ourselves. The process we are laying out is one that is familiar to community organizers, civic engagers, and design thinkers. Step one: collect personal stories. If you have a personal story to share, Clay, we've supplied an avenue to do so. Every story should be heard. Every single one. Please do share—I would benefit from your personal story that prompted such a strong response. Step two: Town Hall... let's start to talk to each other without assumptions of outcome. That's solid design process! Join on the call on Tuesday. If you are having reservations about the trajectory of the dialogue—be there to let the organization know. And push up the comments you agree with. I can assure you this—the conversation will stay open and be productive if we all avoid making assumptions about each other's intentions. I don't see that AIGA has expressed and interest in advocating for preferential treatment for any one. I look forward to hearing from you on Tuesday.

  • Richard Hollant commented on the article "Racial Justice by Design"

    Thanks for sharing your background, Willhemina. There are a lot of initiatives in AIGA where you can get involved. We'd welcome your knowledge and experience!

  • Richard Hollant commented on the article "Racial Justice by Design"

    Everyone is welcome...everyone!

  • Richard Hollant commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3082&id=2096"

    Hi Ric: We met at the leadership retreat and this kind of messaging is exactly the kind of thoughtful, heartful comments I've come to appreciate from AIGA. I'm a designer who was born in Haiti. We've had a loss close to our family in the aftermath of the quake a few weeks ago. I'm getting daily info from relatives in Haiti regarding how awful things really are. As a people, I would characterize Haitians as a hopeful group—a spiritual group. Positive messages of support mean a lot to us. As we focus attention on rebuilding and fund-raising and aid dispensing, let's also remember to send communications of empathy and warmth. I know the people on that island cherish those sentiments—they've seen us through a lot. On a pragmatic basis, there are issues of exploitation that are starting to occur. In NYC, Haitians who are filing for the extension of temporary residency (fees waived by the Gov) are being charged outrageous fees for "processing and handling" by non-government profiteers. These victims, who typically don't speak english and have a fear of enforcement / authority are faced with the misrepresented dilemma of coming up with thousands of dollars to have simple files submitted for them or face deportation back to a ravaged country. This is a media and mass-communications issue that is right in the AIGA wheel-house. I'd be happy to work with/connect anyone with the ability to bring some focus to this aspect of the second wave of the quake aftermath. rich@colabinc.com