Patrick Fredrickson

Member Since February 2005
Member Type Sustaining
AIGA Chapter Los Angeles
Title Project Director
Company Altitude Design Office
Email moc.em@2derfp
Website fredcollections.com
Portfolio Site pfred2.prosite.com/
Field Environmental design
Exhibition design
Design/Graphic design
Bio As a director, designer, and mentor, Patrick specializes in the production of engaging visitor experiences, storytelling environments, and public spaces. He is currently Project Director for Altitude Design Office, developing signage, wayfinding, and innovative, branded environments. Previously, Patrick has worked with Selbert Perkins Design Collaborative, developing wayfinding programs for Civic, Education, and Retail clients; the Autry National Center, leading the in-house team in developing experiences, graphics, media, furniture, and identities for public and gallery environments; and the J. Paul Getty Museum, working with an award winning design team to reinstall the Getty Villa and numerous exhibition and education projects for the museum. From concept to completion, Patrick is focused on developing collaborative processes and strategies that balance the needs of the client with those of the public.
  • Patrick updated a project on Behance.
    NATIVE VOICES AT THE AUTRY IDENTITY: WESTERN FRONTIERS IDENTITY: GRANITE FRONTIERS INTERTRIBAL ARTS MARKETPLACE
  • Patrick Fredrickson commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3082&id=2754"

    Now that is has been 7 years, are there any updates that can be shared on this initiative? Or guidance on how members, local chapters, or firms can get involved in the discussion?

  • Patrick updated a project on Behance.
    #todaysrobot #todaysrobot #sterlingswords i remember, i like, i want to see...
  • Patrick updated a project on Behance.
    ART OF THE WEST JEWS IN THE LOS ANGELES MOSAIC A LIVING TRADITION: The Art of Basketry MUSEUM CASEWORK & FURNITURE
  • Patrick updated a project on Behance.
    KATSINA IN HOPI LIFE ALL THE SAINTS OF THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES ART ALONG THE HYPHEN: THE MEXICAN AMERICAN GENERATION THE COLT REVOLVER IN THE AMERICAN WEST
  • Patrick updated a project on Behance.
    AUTRY PRINTED MATERIALS IDENTITY ARCANGELO ENTERTAINMENT/ARCANGELO INTERNATIONAL ORDER/OTHELLO
  • Patrick updated a project on Behance.
    GRANITE FRONTIERS: A CENTURY OF YOSEMITE CLIMBING SIQUEIROS IN LOS ANGELES: CENSORSHIP DEFIED
  • Patrick Fredrickson commented on the article "A movement to make internships fairer"

    I understand the concerns of taking advantage of interns. However, as listed above, there are rules governing the definition of and work of interns. It seems the current backlash has become "all interns should be paid internships" rather than lets inform each other of and enforce the laws. Doesn't the recent legislation point to ignoring the criteria? If I had the opportunity to pay interns, I certainly would. However, I run an in-house creative department thus I don't total control over use of funds. Should this exclude in-house departments of the opportunity to reach out to students and provide educational opportunities? The most difficult portion of the criteria to define and adhere to is #4. "The employer that provides the training derives no immediate advantage from the activities of the intern; and on occasion its operations may actually be impeded." How one does not derive advantages from interns is difficult to define. I can assure you the operations may actually be impeded by the work of interns. The amount of time given to directing the work, breaking needs down into minute step-by-step operations, and reworking products to turn them into any manner of usable form certainly impedes upon daily operations. On the other hand, providing this training hopefully helps to develop a better informed employee upon graduation, a designer with a better understanding of the tedious tasks necessary to develop products, the detail needed for good presentation, how to take creative direction, what collaborative discussions entail, and the number of iterations that will get thrown out the window. It also provides an opportunity for more junior design staff to learn the skills of directing others, thus creating growth opportunities for not only the intern but also the staff. I agree many companies are taking advantage of internships. I support AIGA trying to raise some awareness of the issue. I hope this awareness does not ignore the advantages internships can provide regardless of the companies or departments ability to pay.

  • Patrick Fredrickson commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3082&id=2754"

    Now that is has been 7 years, are there any updates that can be shared on this initiative? Or guidance on how members, local chapters, or firms can get involved in the discussion?

  • Patrick Fredrickson commented on the article "A movement to make internships fairer"

    I understand the concerns of taking advantage of interns. However, as listed above, there are rules governing the definition of and work of interns. It seems the current backlash has become "all interns should be paid internships" rather than lets inform each other of and enforce the laws. Doesn't the recent legislation point to ignoring the criteria? If I had the opportunity to pay interns, I certainly would. However, I run an in-house creative department thus I don't total control over use of funds. Should this exclude in-house departments of the opportunity to reach out to students and provide educational opportunities? The most difficult portion of the criteria to define and adhere to is #4. "The employer that provides the training derives no immediate advantage from the activities of the intern; and on occasion its operations may actually be impeded." How one does not derive advantages from interns is difficult to define. I can assure you the operations may actually be impeded by the work of interns. The amount of time given to directing the work, breaking needs down into minute step-by-step operations, and reworking products to turn them into any manner of usable form certainly impedes upon daily operations. On the other hand, providing this training hopefully helps to develop a better informed employee upon graduation, a designer with a better understanding of the tedious tasks necessary to develop products, the detail needed for good presentation, how to take creative direction, what collaborative discussions entail, and the number of iterations that will get thrown out the window. It also provides an opportunity for more junior design staff to learn the skills of directing others, thus creating growth opportunities for not only the intern but also the staff. I agree many companies are taking advantage of internships. I support AIGA trying to raise some awareness of the issue. I hope this awareness does not ignore the advantages internships can provide regardless of the companies or departments ability to pay.

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