Tricia N. Rosetty

Member Type Non-member
Bio

I currently work as an help content strategist atEventbrite, a SaaS start-up run by smart people who believe amazing things happen when people come together for live experiences.

As a founding member of the customer experience operations team, I’m on a mission to create a kick-ass self-service experience for our customers. We believe self-help shouldn’t suck—long “FAQ” lists of not-my-question or overwhelming, irrelevant forum discussions are so 1995.

Starting my career as a journalist in Texas, I moved across the country to Pennsylvania to get my start in content strategy with digital creative agencies working with clients ranging from San Francisco tech startups to health care and education leaders.

Now I share my San Francisco home—complete with a library that includes a personal copy of the OED—with my rescue mutt, Paparazzi (and a couple awesome roommates because, hey, it’s SF). Outside of work, I spend timedefending the validity of the Oxford commareading everything I can and rogue editing for the hell of it.

  • Tricia authored "Should AIGA Certify Designers?"
  • Tricia Rosetty commented on the article "Should AIGA Certify Designers?"

    Hi Leila— Thanks for your really thoughtful response to the issue. I wanted to clarify a few points. On the relationship between design programs and certification: the point I was trying to make is that there should be a strong relationship between professional organizations and academic programs so that people most active in the field can help ensure programs are providing the type of training students will need to land real jobs when they graduate. Something like certification would provide a consistent baseline against which different programs could measure. Again, it wouldn't be the only relevant thing, but it could help programs really see where they need to make changes to best prepare their students.  I think your suggestion to include certification with higher education programs is a great manifestation of using certification to strengthen programs—there was one AIGA member who contacted me directly about a PM program that used PMI standards as a core for their master's program, and I thought that was really fantastic. I would like to add that I strongly believe that any professional, including recent graduates, should be budgeting for ongoing professional education. The money I've put into my career development post-college has been some of the best money I've ever spent. I'd actually disagree with your assertion that "the portfolio is ultimately king." Portfolios on their own lack context (e.g., was this a piece created for a client with real constraints like budget and personal quirks?) or a good sense of how a piece truly evolved (was there a creative director taking over the reigns all the time or did this piece take 9 months to get right?).  Many of these issues can be addressed through portfolio presentation (which also shows how well a potential hire could present design work to a client, a skill that is arguably as important as the design itself), but I'm starting to see the value in "auditions" that involve sitting down with a designer and seeing how the group actually works together. The right person can often be taught the hard skills that will push them to the next level. Also, I really can't emphasize enough how difficult it can be to evaluate a portfolio's quality if you're not trained to understand what makes good design effective or not. I work in the industry, and I still found myself fighting the impulse to simply pick a designer whose work I liked rather than the harder task of finding someone thoughtful and skilled. Designers have to help clients "get it." It's great that you were educated at a solid program, but not everyone has that experience—or, for that matter, learns that their education hasn't done them justice before they graduate (I speak from personal experience on this point). I think the idea of "accrediting" programs has potential, though it's definitely something I know less about. I'd love to see more discussion about that. Lastly, to your postscript. I chose hairstyling as another licensed profession because it's something most people are far more familiar and comfortable with. We get our hair done all the time, yet we have clear standards for who can offer these services professionally. If we require standards for such common things, why not expect them for something that's more out of the ordinary?

  • Tricia Rosetty commented on the article "Should AIGA Certify Designers?"

    Do you have specific concerns about the downsides of certification you could elaborate on?

  • Tricia Rosetty commented on the article "Should AIGA Certify Designers?"

    Why shouldn't AIGA facilitate more educational experiences for members? People crave learning new, marketable skills, and I think the more educational opportunities the better! Something else to keep in mind is that many, many clients will do their best to research and work with designers, but at the end of the day they are experts in their business, not creative services. I work with designers every day and even I found it surprisingly challenging to find and vet designers. I think we forget this aspect of the client experience too often.

  • Tricia Rosetty commented on the article "Should AIGA Certify Designers?"

    I'm glad you mentioned ethics: that's something that part of PMI membership (agreeing to a set of PM-specific ethics). I think that's a valuable aspect of professional organizations. I'm not sure I agree with education and career longevity as good measures, just because I've seen too many instances of those being poor indicators of current capabilities being up to snuff. I'd love to see strong peer reviews as part of AIGA, not just with students. Especially in Central PA, we have a lot of people who work alone as designers in their companies, and what you can learn from other AIGA members can be really valuable.

  • Tricia Rosetty commented on the article "Should AIGA Certify Designers?"

    I strongly agree with your last statement! And I'm not suggesting that certification would be the only or even best answer to some of the common issues of being a creative professional. To me, the experience of becoming credentialed is most valuable if it in fact helps teach those kinds of practical skills (e.g., presenting design strategy in a compelling manner).

  • Tricia Rosetty commented on the article "Should AIGA Certify Designers?"

    Hi Leila— Thanks for your really thoughtful response to the issue. I wanted to clarify a few points. On the relationship between design programs and certification: the point I was trying to make is that there should be a strong relationship between professional organizations and academic programs so that people most active in the field can help ensure programs are providing the type of training students will need to land real jobs when they graduate. Something like certification would provide a consistent baseline against which different programs could measure. Again, it wouldn't be the only relevant thing, but it could help programs really see where they need to make changes to best prepare their students.  I think your suggestion to include certification with higher education programs is a great manifestation of using certification to strengthen programs—there was one AIGA member who contacted me directly about a PM program that used PMI standards as a core for their master's program, and I thought that was really fantastic. I would like to add that I strongly believe that any professional, including recent graduates, should be budgeting for ongoing professional education. The money I've put into my career development post-college has been some of the best money I've ever spent. I'd actually disagree with your assertion that "the portfolio is ultimately king." Portfolios on their own lack context (e.g., was this a piece created for a client with real constraints like budget and personal quirks?) or a good sense of how a piece truly evolved (was there a creative director taking over the reigns all the time or did this piece take 9 months to get right?).  Many of these issues can be addressed through portfolio presentation (which also shows how well a potential hire could present design work to a client, a skill that is arguably as important as the design itself), but I'm starting to see the value in "auditions" that involve sitting down with a designer and seeing how the group actually works together. The right person can often be taught the hard skills that will push them to the next level. Also, I really can't emphasize enough how difficult it can be to evaluate a portfolio's quality if you're not trained to understand what makes good design effective or not. I work in the industry, and I still found myself fighting the impulse to simply pick a designer whose work I liked rather than the harder task of finding someone thoughtful and skilled. Designers have to help clients "get it." It's great that you were educated at a solid program, but not everyone has that experience—or, for that matter, learns that their education hasn't done them justice before they graduate (I speak from personal experience on this point). I think the idea of "accrediting" programs has potential, though it's definitely something I know less about. I'd love to see more discussion about that. Lastly, to your postscript. I chose hairstyling as another licensed profession because it's something most people are far more familiar and comfortable with. We get our hair done all the time, yet we have clear standards for who can offer these services professionally. If we require standards for such common things, why not expect them for something that's more out of the ordinary?

  • Tricia Rosetty commented on the article "Should AIGA Certify Designers?"

    Do you have specific concerns about the downsides of certification you could elaborate on?

  • Tricia Rosetty commented on the article "Should AIGA Certify Designers?"

    Why shouldn't AIGA facilitate more educational experiences for members? People crave learning new, marketable skills, and I think the more educational opportunities the better! Something else to keep in mind is that many, many clients will do their best to research and work with designers, but at the end of the day they are experts in their business, not creative services. I work with designers every day and even I found it surprisingly challenging to find and vet designers. I think we forget this aspect of the client experience too often.

  • Tricia Rosetty commented on the article "Should AIGA Certify Designers?"

    I'm glad you mentioned ethics: that's something that part of PMI membership (agreeing to a set of PM-specific ethics). I think that's a valuable aspect of professional organizations. I'm not sure I agree with education and career longevity as good measures, just because I've seen too many instances of those being poor indicators of current capabilities being up to snuff. I'd love to see strong peer reviews as part of AIGA, not just with students. Especially in Central PA, we have a lot of people who work alone as designers in their companies, and what you can learn from other AIGA members can be really valuable.

  • Tricia Rosetty commented on the article "Should AIGA Certify Designers?"

    I strongly agree with your last statement! And I'm not suggesting that certification would be the only or even best answer to some of the common issues of being a creative professional. To me, the experience of becoming credentialed is most valuable if it in fact helps teach those kinds of practical skills (e.g., presenting design strategy in a compelling manner).