Mr. Art Thompson, Jr.

About Me

Lover of visual junk.

Member Since January 2008
Member Type Sustaining
AIGA Chapter Austin
Title Chief Creative
Company Logical Things
Email moc.sgnihtlacigol@tra
Website www.logicalthings.com
Field Interaction design
Design/Graphic design
Brand and identity
Available for independent projects Yes
Bio Lover of visual junk, maker of beautiful web stuff, fermenter of various things, hoarder of vinyl records.
  • Art Thompson, Jr commented on the article "http://staging.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=2657"

    Those idyllic images created by Haddon Sundblom for Coca Cola are unmatched to this day in terms of their sheer sentimentality (and thus marketing power). I'm sure you're familiar with another idyllic image Sundblom painted for Playboy's 1972 Christmas issue (cover) which was embellished with a typographical parody of the Coca-Cola logo...

  • Art Thompson, Jr commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=2572"

    I've lived and worked through the "ugly" and "dirty" periods as well as their various "nostalgia" twists and turns and feel this is all great fun to think and write and talk about in the here and now. But let's not lose sight of the fact that we're still so entrenched in the infancy of computer-based design--whether for print, web or motion—that it's probably going to be a while before any of it can be properly put in its place on the design time line. Way-back machine: Mr. Heller publishes his perceived disdain for the "Cult of the Ugly" in a 1993 Eye Magazine (#9) article and is subsequently called out by Rudy VanderLans in his Emigre Magazine (#30) rebuttal "Fallout" only to have the discourse play out in that same issue's interviews with Mr. Heller, Mr. Shields, Mr. Keedy and Mr. Fella (presumably no Mrs. or Ms. are available for comment?). It was amusing then and still is today as is much critical discourse after the fact. BTW, all of this is available on the two publications' websites. Anyway, that was 16 years ago--coinciding with the birth of the world wide web. Mr. Shields contends in his interview that no part of "Output," the Cranbrook student publication that was the target of Mr. Heller's venom, was composed on a Mac and I'll propose here that none of it was created with a graphical web, broadband internet and 19- to 21-inch color displays in mind. It's pretty easy to look back on "ugly" as a blip when compared to what happened to design once the web blew its doors open. I don't mean to discount the discussion of trends in visual communication, as we are all inspired by the times or possibly even guilty of indulging in them. But it seems like these "eras" are getting shorter and shorter, some lasting not even a decade. And isn't everything old always new again? Is there really so much different about the radical-ness of the '6os free press movement, the mind-expanding poster design of the psychedelic '70s, the punk DIY/zine aesthetic of the early '80s, the ugly, grungy, "end of print" '90s or the hand-made craftiness of the '00s – all "anti-digital" -- other than a different machine against which to rage?

  • Art Thompson, Jr commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=1588"

    Picture taken in a central Tennessee gas station on July 16, 2008: http://NoRelevance.com/Speak_English.jpg Otherwise, noted without comment.

  • Art Thompson, Jr commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3082&id=2094"

    I (finally) joined AIGA last December and was perplexed by the shiny, plastic membership card I received, looking much like a "platinum" level credit card in finish, size and weight. The card displays my name, ID number, membership category, year joined and expiration date--exactly one year from the date I joined--and, on the reverse, the AIGA mission statement. I pondered the existence of this card for some time and couldn't quite figure out how an organization of design professionals could produce a membership card with such a negative value-to-cost ratio. And, by cost, I mean more than the plastic it's printed on. With talk of "sustainable" design buzzing around for the past several years I'm surprised that AIGA distributes a plastic membership card, much less one that's only valid for a year. Nowhere on the card are listed the benefits for carrying it, so I question why I would even bother (I don't, in fact). This leads me to view it as an immediate part of my non-recyclable waste stream, now facilitated by AIGA. What do I do with it after a year's time? What do I do with it now? I don't mean to sound disrespectful and apologize if this is not the proper forum to be posting such a comment. I just haven't seen this topic mentioned anywhere else on AIGA.org and wasn't sure why it wasn't up for discussion already. Has it been and I just missed it?

  • Art Thompson, Jr commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=2370"

    I enjoyed learning that, though he developed an intricate system for laying out his color grids, it was in fact Ellsworth Kelly's limited supply of pre-printed, self-adhesive, colored paper squares (that he used to make his small-scale studies) which led to his groundbreaking work "Colors for a Large Wall." One could say that his more flushed-out studies had set the precedent for color placement and relation. However, I prefer to think it was the challenge of working with a limited palette and fewer actual squares than his 8x8 grid demanded that led to the success of this particular study and its eventual execution as a large-scale painting. Thanks for the fine article, Phil.

  • Art Thompson, Jr commented on the article "http://staging.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=2657"

    Those idyllic images created by Haddon Sundblom for Coca Cola are unmatched to this day in terms of their sheer sentimentality (and thus marketing power). I'm sure you're familiar with another idyllic image Sundblom painted for Playboy's 1972 Christmas issue (cover) which was embellished with a typographical parody of the Coca-Cola logo...

  • Art Thompson, Jr commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=2572"

    I've lived and worked through the "ugly" and "dirty" periods as well as their various "nostalgia" twists and turns and feel this is all great fun to think and write and talk about in the here and now. But let's not lose sight of the fact that we're still so entrenched in the infancy of computer-based design--whether for print, web or motion—that it's probably going to be a while before any of it can be properly put in its place on the design time line. Way-back machine: Mr. Heller publishes his perceived disdain for the "Cult of the Ugly" in a 1993 Eye Magazine (#9) article and is subsequently called out by Rudy VanderLans in his Emigre Magazine (#30) rebuttal "Fallout" only to have the discourse play out in that same issue's interviews with Mr. Heller, Mr. Shields, Mr. Keedy and Mr. Fella (presumably no Mrs. or Ms. are available for comment?). It was amusing then and still is today as is much critical discourse after the fact. BTW, all of this is available on the two publications' websites. Anyway, that was 16 years ago--coinciding with the birth of the world wide web. Mr. Shields contends in his interview that no part of "Output," the Cranbrook student publication that was the target of Mr. Heller's venom, was composed on a Mac and I'll propose here that none of it was created with a graphical web, broadband internet and 19- to 21-inch color displays in mind. It's pretty easy to look back on "ugly" as a blip when compared to what happened to design once the web blew its doors open. I don't mean to discount the discussion of trends in visual communication, as we are all inspired by the times or possibly even guilty of indulging in them. But it seems like these "eras" are getting shorter and shorter, some lasting not even a decade. And isn't everything old always new again? Is there really so much different about the radical-ness of the '6os free press movement, the mind-expanding poster design of the psychedelic '70s, the punk DIY/zine aesthetic of the early '80s, the ugly, grungy, "end of print" '90s or the hand-made craftiness of the '00s – all "anti-digital" -- other than a different machine against which to rage?

  • Art Thompson, Jr commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=1588"

    Picture taken in a central Tennessee gas station on July 16, 2008: http://NoRelevance.com/Speak_English.jpg Otherwise, noted without comment.

  • Art Thompson, Jr commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3082&id=2094"

    I (finally) joined AIGA last December and was perplexed by the shiny, plastic membership card I received, looking much like a "platinum" level credit card in finish, size and weight. The card displays my name, ID number, membership category, year joined and expiration date--exactly one year from the date I joined--and, on the reverse, the AIGA mission statement. I pondered the existence of this card for some time and couldn't quite figure out how an organization of design professionals could produce a membership card with such a negative value-to-cost ratio. And, by cost, I mean more than the plastic it's printed on. With talk of "sustainable" design buzzing around for the past several years I'm surprised that AIGA distributes a plastic membership card, much less one that's only valid for a year. Nowhere on the card are listed the benefits for carrying it, so I question why I would even bother (I don't, in fact). This leads me to view it as an immediate part of my non-recyclable waste stream, now facilitated by AIGA. What do I do with it after a year's time? What do I do with it now? I don't mean to sound disrespectful and apologize if this is not the proper forum to be posting such a comment. I just haven't seen this topic mentioned anywhere else on AIGA.org and wasn't sure why it wasn't up for discussion already. Has it been and I just missed it?

  • Art Thompson, Jr commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=2370"

    I enjoyed learning that, though he developed an intricate system for laying out his color grids, it was in fact Ellsworth Kelly's limited supply of pre-printed, self-adhesive, colored paper squares (that he used to make his small-scale studies) which led to his groundbreaking work "Colors for a Large Wall." One could say that his more flushed-out studies had set the precedent for color placement and relation. However, I prefer to think it was the challenge of working with a limited palette and fewer actual squares than his 8x8 grid demanded that led to the success of this particular study and its eventual execution as a large-scale painting. Thanks for the fine article, Phil.

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