Timothy R. Belonax

About Me

RISD / Project M / MINE / CalArts / Facebook

Member Since November 2003
Member Type Supporter
AIGA Chapter San Francisco
Email moc.xanolebmit@mit
Website www.timbelonax.com
Portfolio Site www.facebook.timbelonax.com
Field Communication design
Brand and identity
Educator
Bio

Tim Belonax is a San Francisco-based designer, writer, and educator whose work for nonprofits and corporations has been recognized internationally. He's an Adjunct Professor at California College of the Arts and a board member at the San Francisco Center for the Book. He's studied at CalArts and holds a BFA from Rhode Island School of Design.

  • Timothy Belonax commented on the article "http://staging.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=8921"

    I was planning on seeing the movie, but this article made me more active in seeking it out. It's a great film. I also recently came across an essay by Mills regarding skate culture's use of the vernacular, in the exhibition book "Lift & Separate." The whole book is a fantastic combination of graphic design and design writing. Mr. Mills keeps amazing company within its pages (Keedy, Glauber, Wild).

  • Tim Belonax commented on the article "http://staging.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=8852"

    It'll be interesting to see how designers react to this hoarding/collecting mentality in a decade or two. With more and more content being produced only for the screen, less will be around to physically collect. Will we mourn the loss of the "designed artifact" or blissfully transition into bits & bytes? Just by reading a few responses here, one can sense a certain gilt in the air, perhaps signalling momentum in a direction. This article also made me think about how our passive collection of design could also be linked to general consumerist habits. When we see a beautifully designed thing, we want to have it, to enjoy it for ourselves (selfish, right?). Mr. Heller points out the act of donating to an archive, which is a much more communal action. Will grassroots design collections start popping up where we can all offload our precious artifacts?

  • Tim Belonax commented on the article "http://staging.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=8907"

    The concerns surrounding the negative effects of "advanced" technology seem to ebb and flow. I've seen this article from Rick Poynor floating around recently (http://www.printmag.com/Article/Design-as-Dictator) which voices a similar concern. While this doesn't directly relate to technological advances, I've always felt that exit numbers on freeways robbed navigators of their contextual importance, sacrificing personality for information. A street is no longer linked to a historical figure or regional milestone, it becomes just another number. Regarding Chris' post above, I think there's a connection between the resurgence of bike culture and this link to exploration and discovery. Whenever I bike through a town or city, I know my travel is more than just an A-to-B scenario. David Byrne has some interesting stories regarding this in his book, "Bicycle Diaries."

  • Tim Belonax commented on the article "http://staging.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3078&id=8892"

    It seems like most designers are taking this change in stride, acknowledging that MyPlate IS an improvement on the previous graphic, but there's still improvements to be made. I agree. This interview with Christopher Simmons and Michael Bierut seemed to sum things up: http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7368214n&tag=cbsnewsTwoColUpperPromoArea I'm actually more surprised that there isn't a flood of comments and speculative redesigns floating around the internet (a la Gap's or Tropicana' redesign). Perhaps designers have learned a lesson or they just aren't interested in such an "unsexy" problem. Mr. Bierut said that MyPlate was as good as government design gets. Why can't it be better?

  • Timothy R. Belonax commented on the article "Is Archer's Use on Target?"

    Lauren, this post couldn't come soon enough. Thank you. I completely agree with Mr. Earls' quote at the end of your article. Too many designers aren't giving the typeface proper consideration. I fear its omnipresence is a reflection of emotional type selection that ignores historic appropriateness and typographic intent. Selecting a well-designed typeface does not guarantee good typography. Designers, there's still work to be done.

  • Timothy R. Belonax commented on the article "http://staging.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=2206"

    What John is doing with Project M represents the current zeitgeist of graphic design. This is the next notch on the "History of Graphic Design" timeline. Congrats to John, all the advisors, and my fellow Mers.

  • Timothy Belonax commented on the article "http://staging.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=8921"

    I was planning on seeing the movie, but this article made me more active in seeking it out. It's a great film. I also recently came across an essay by Mills regarding skate culture's use of the vernacular, in the exhibition book "Lift & Separate." The whole book is a fantastic combination of graphic design and design writing. Mr. Mills keeps amazing company within its pages (Keedy, Glauber, Wild).

  • Tim Belonax commented on the article "http://staging.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=8852"

    It'll be interesting to see how designers react to this hoarding/collecting mentality in a decade or two. With more and more content being produced only for the screen, less will be around to physically collect. Will we mourn the loss of the "designed artifact" or blissfully transition into bits & bytes? Just by reading a few responses here, one can sense a certain gilt in the air, perhaps signalling momentum in a direction. This article also made me think about how our passive collection of design could also be linked to general consumerist habits. When we see a beautifully designed thing, we want to have it, to enjoy it for ourselves (selfish, right?). Mr. Heller points out the act of donating to an archive, which is a much more communal action. Will grassroots design collections start popping up where we can all offload our precious artifacts?

  • Tim Belonax commented on the article "http://staging.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=8907"

    The concerns surrounding the negative effects of "advanced" technology seem to ebb and flow. I've seen this article from Rick Poynor floating around recently (http://www.printmag.com/Article/Design-as-Dictator) which voices a similar concern. While this doesn't directly relate to technological advances, I've always felt that exit numbers on freeways robbed navigators of their contextual importance, sacrificing personality for information. A street is no longer linked to a historical figure or regional milestone, it becomes just another number. Regarding Chris' post above, I think there's a connection between the resurgence of bike culture and this link to exploration and discovery. Whenever I bike through a town or city, I know my travel is more than just an A-to-B scenario. David Byrne has some interesting stories regarding this in his book, "Bicycle Diaries."

  • Tim Belonax commented on the article "http://staging.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3078&id=8892"

    It seems like most designers are taking this change in stride, acknowledging that MyPlate IS an improvement on the previous graphic, but there's still improvements to be made. I agree. This interview with Christopher Simmons and Michael Bierut seemed to sum things up: http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7368214n&tag=cbsnewsTwoColUpperPromoArea I'm actually more surprised that there isn't a flood of comments and speculative redesigns floating around the internet (a la Gap's or Tropicana' redesign). Perhaps designers have learned a lesson or they just aren't interested in such an "unsexy" problem. Mr. Bierut said that MyPlate was as good as government design gets. Why can't it be better?

  • Timothy R. Belonax commented on the article "Is Archer's Use on Target?"

    Lauren, this post couldn't come soon enough. Thank you. I completely agree with Mr. Earls' quote at the end of your article. Too many designers aren't giving the typeface proper consideration. I fear its omnipresence is a reflection of emotional type selection that ignores historic appropriateness and typographic intent. Selecting a well-designed typeface does not guarantee good typography. Designers, there's still work to be done.

  • Timothy R. Belonax commented on the article "http://staging.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=2206"

    What John is doing with Project M represents the current zeitgeist of graphic design. This is the next notch on the "History of Graphic Design" timeline. Congrats to John, all the advisors, and my fellow Mers.

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