Mr. Christopher Liechty

Member Since December 1998
Member Type Sustaining
AIGA Chapter Salt Lake City
Title VP of Marketing
Company People's Intermountain Bank
Email moc.faknab@ythceil.rehpotsirhc
Website christopherliechty.com
Field Service design
Experience design
Design/Graphic design
  • Christopher authored "The Third Culture Way to Better Business Relationships"
  • Christopher Liechty commented on the article "A new view of AIGA"

    I see this "New View of AIGA" as an extension of what has been developing for 10+ years. As one who has evolved from daily crafting to mainly design thinking, I want to continue to be involved in AIGA. This new vision isn't so new, it's just a reflection of the reality on the ground. In Salt Lake City, we are in the process of planning the second annual Salt Lake Design Week. It involves design of every discipline, design thinking, social and a celebration of craft. The standards are still high and maybe higher. I look forward to being involved well into the future.

  • Christopher Liechty commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3082&id=2804"

    I would like to express my thanks to Icograda and to many Icograda leaders for their generosity, friendship and guidance over the years. It's amazing to see how much AIGA has matured in it's international understanding and role over the past decade. In the late 90s, international issues were not very important to the AIGA population at large. I remember attending AIGA Leadership Retreats where international discussions were met with glazed eyes of disinterest. After September 11, 2001, U.S. designers and the population in general began a new relationship with the world. Even though AIGA did not formally join Icograda until 2005, a small group of AIGA designers began a close relationship with Icograda in 2000--2001. In 2002, the AIGA Center for Cross-Cultural Design (AIGA XCD) was formed as an AIGA community of Interest. Nearly every one of our international connections (with Cuba, with the Philippines, with China, the Middle East, Europe, etc.) were made possible through Icograda introductions and support. Robert Peters, Thierry Van Kerm, and Brenda Sanderson were especially supportive. Some years later at another AIGA Leadership Retreat, we were looking to the future and setting goals. We envisioned a time when International issues would become so core to AIGA's mission that thinking globally would simply be a part of everything AIGA did. While I am sad that the formal membership of AIGA in Icograda has ended, I don't see the relationship ending. I also wonder if that vision of integrated globalism is not beginning to become a reality within AIGA. My understanding is that International and multi-cultural issues continue to be among the top priorities. I look forward to seeing how AIGA's role in the world will continue to blossom. Icograda has played a key role in this development and I would like to honor that.

  • Christopher Liechty commented on the article "A new view of AIGA"

    I see this "New View of AIGA" as an extension of what has been developing for 10+ years. As one who has evolved from daily crafting to mainly design thinking, I want to continue to be involved in AIGA. This new vision isn't so new, it's just a reflection of the reality on the ground. In Salt Lake City, we are in the process of planning the second annual Salt Lake Design Week. It involves design of every discipline, design thinking, social and a celebration of craft. The standards are still high and maybe higher. I look forward to being involved well into the future.

  • Christopher Liechty commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3082&id=2804"

    I would like to express my thanks to Icograda and to many Icograda leaders for their generosity, friendship and guidance over the years. It's amazing to see how much AIGA has matured in it's international understanding and role over the past decade. In the late 90s, international issues were not very important to the AIGA population at large. I remember attending AIGA Leadership Retreats where international discussions were met with glazed eyes of disinterest. After September 11, 2001, U.S. designers and the population in general began a new relationship with the world. Even though AIGA did not formally join Icograda until 2005, a small group of AIGA designers began a close relationship with Icograda in 2000--2001. In 2002, the AIGA Center for Cross-Cultural Design (AIGA XCD) was formed as an AIGA community of Interest. Nearly every one of our international connections (with Cuba, with the Philippines, with China, the Middle East, Europe, etc.) were made possible through Icograda introductions and support. Robert Peters, Thierry Van Kerm, and Brenda Sanderson were especially supportive. Some years later at another AIGA Leadership Retreat, we were looking to the future and setting goals. We envisioned a time when International issues would become so core to AIGA's mission that thinking globally would simply be a part of everything AIGA did. While I am sad that the formal membership of AIGA in Icograda has ended, I don't see the relationship ending. I also wonder if that vision of integrated globalism is not beginning to become a reality within AIGA. My understanding is that International and multi-cultural issues continue to be among the top priorities. I look forward to seeing how AIGA's role in the world will continue to blossom. Icograda has played a key role in this development and I would like to honor that.