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  • A century of influence and achievement



    This spring, The AIGA Centennial Gala brought together hundreds from the design community to celebrate the AIGA Centennial and recognize the contributions of 24 design visionaries with the prestigious AIGA Medal. Co-chaired by AIGA members Mark Randall (Worldstudio) and David Gibson (Two Twelve) and hosted by Michael Bierut (Pentagram Design), the Gala provided an opportunity for attendees to come together in New York City to celebrate an extraordinary profession and its achievements.

    To frame the celebration and extend the experience beyond those in attendance, we asked AIGA Medalists, Fellows, and national and chapter presidents to select a year from AIGA’s 100-year history and create a social, political or cultural statement. The resulting project is a testament to the talent and vision that can be found in the ranks of AIGA members.

    The focus of the evening was honoring the distinguished practitioners, educators and role models whose creativity, intelligence, perception and skill have inspired and shaped the entire design profession. At the Gala, a centennial class of 24 designers were awarded with the AIGA Medal in recognition of their exceptional achievements.

    We encourage you to explore and share the Medalists’ biographies below, and learn more about the AIGA Centennial to see how you can help celebrate a century of design this year.   

    The 2014 AIGA Medalists

    Sean Adams and Noreen Morioka
    Sean Adams & Noreen Morioka
    Recognized for bringing wit, charm and a distinctly California sensibility to design and for their commitment to leading the design profession through an era of change.
    Charles S. Anderson Portrait 147
    Charles S. Anderson
    Recognized for creating a design language that elevates the vernacular into a playful, modern design style and pioneering the role of designer as entrepreneur.
    Dana Arnett headshot 300w
    Dana Arnett
    Recognized for setting the highest standards for communicating corporate interests and championing design as a strategic, multidisciplinary function for both firm and client.
    Carbone/Smolan headshot 300w
    Kenneth Carbone & Leslie Smolan
    Recognized for demonstrating across decades the power of beautiful and well-reasoned design principles in corporate identity, communication, publishing and strategy to designers, business and the public.
    David Carson headshot 300w
    David Carson
    Recognized for breaking the rules, nearly untethering legibility from communication and inspiring a generation of young designers with his bold understanding of cultural style.
    Kyle Cooper portrait 300x300
    Kyle Cooper
    Recognized for designing title sequences for film and television with bold and unexpected style and conjuring emotional response through his captivating use of narrative.
    Michael Cronan headshot 300w
    Michael Cronan
    Recognized for crafting iconic names, identities and branding strategies that have become an essential part of the American vernacular and for his generosity of spirit.
    Richard Danne
    Richard Danne
    Recognized for elegant, effective design for corporate and cultural contexts and for sustaining a decades-long commitment to strengthening the design community.
    Michael Donovan and Nancye Green
    Michael Donovan & Nancye Green
    Recognized for setting new standards in the design of environments and experiences and leading the profession in the ever-expanding dimensions of communication, entrepreneurship and strategy.
    Stephen Doyle headshot 300w
    Stephen Doyle
    Recognized as the ultimate “designer’s designer,” merging imagination, intelligence, creativity and craftsmanship through incisive and enduring design.
    Louise Fili headshot 300w
    Louise Fili
    Recognized for impeccable craftsmanship, elegant use of typography and designing with a passion and focus that is the envy of every designer.
    Robert Greenberg headshot 300w
    Bob Greenberg
    Recognized for boldly envisioning the future and then designing for it, effortlessly leading his agency through decades of strategic change.
    Sylvia Harris headshot 300w
    Sylvia Harris
    Recognized for an unerring commitment to using design to improve the civic experience and for influencing a generation of designers as a teacher and mentor.
    Cheryl Heller headshot 300w
    Cheryl Heller
    Recognized for deftly embodying the many dimensions of communication design and for inspiring and guiding people and organizations to use design for social innovation as a strategic tool to improve the human experience.
    Alexander Isley headshot 300w
    Alexander Isley
    Recognized for decades of design that engages the imagination through wit, surprise, intelligence and delight, no matter how complex the story.
    Chip Kidd headshot 300w
    Chip Kidd
    Recognized for possessing an intuitive understanding of narrative and creating books and book cover designs that are at once intriguing, clever and entirely unique.
    Michael Mabry headshot 300w
    Michael Mabry
    Recognized for expertly melding design and illustration to create a playful and sophisticated visual language that is highly intuitive and intuitively right.
    Abbott Miller headshot 300w
    Abbott Miller
    Recognized for design that elevates culture, fusing content and form through elegant and incisive publications, exhibitions and identities.
    Bill Moggridge headshot 300w
    Bill Moggridge
    Recognized for a career and life shaped by the tenets of design thinking—and for his belief that the designer’s ultimate role lies in negotiating the relationship between people and things.
    Gael Towey headshot 300w
    Gael Towey
    Recognized for setting a new standard for unified creative direction across publications, products and experiences for one of the most influential media phenomena of our era.
    Ann Willoughby headshot 300w
    Ann Willoughby
    Recognized for her inquiring design mind, sustained leadership and influence in the design community, social responsibility and for championing the role of women in the profession.

     

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