Mrs. Nancy Sharon Collins

About Me

Country's leading expert on engraved stationery, design etiquette and how we try to get along.

Member Since October 2004
Member Type Sustaining
AIGA Chapter New Orleans
Title Stationer Extraordinaire
Company Nancy Sharon Collins, Stationer LLC
Email ten.knilhtrae@renoitatscsn
Website www.nancysharoncollinsstationer.com
Field Design/Graphic design
Typography
Brand and identity
Bio

Nancy Sharon Collins is the country’s leading expert on engraved social stationery, principal in her eponymous firm, Nancy Sharon Collins, Stationer LLC, and Special Projects Director, AIGA New Orleans chapter. Collins authored The Complete Engraver a guide to monograms, crests, ciphers, seals, and the etiquette and history of social stationery, and has published multiple articles about stationery and monogram engraving. She’s often the subject of popular media such as Vogue and The New York Times. Currently she is a Martha Stewart Maker Award finalist, and has appeared on Martha Stewart’s TV show. Collins is included in Women in Graphic Design 1890-2012 by Gerda Breuer and Julia Meer, she is also a frequent presenter at TypeCon and has presented at ATypeI.

            Mrs. Collins was recently a guest on NPR's Out To Lunch, and presented Law and Lawless in New Orleans at THNOC for the 2015 AIGA Conference in New Orleans.

            Mrs. Collins owned and operated the graphic design firm Nancy Feldman studio in New York City from 1978 to 2004. Clients included Bergdorf Goodman, WaterfordWedgwood, Clinique, Prescriptives, Revlon, Charles of the Ritz, Curve fragrance, The Metropolitan Opera Shop and the Museum of Modern Art.

  • Nancy S. Collins commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=1746"

    This is so cool. Visualizing technology has been a craft of designers for years, thanks for pointing this out.

  • Nancy S. Collins commented on the article "http://staging.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=2901"

    There was a bald-headed guy in the late 1970s who was commisioned to re-design the subway map and visual system, we interviewed him for an advertising show for the Joseloff Gallery, Hartford Art School, in 1976. The designer was a friend of the dean of the art school, Bernard Hanson. Bernard, or "Buck" as he was known, was a very interesting and flamboyant character, he drew big-ticket NYC artists to teach there, such as David Salle and Sandy Skoglund. My buddy and I were the only designers who ever went through the school's MFA program. I may have some pictures from the exhibit. According to my memory, the work the designer did was undone a couple of years later, does this ring a bell? His name was Jim McWilliams, I think. (If this was covered in the article, forgive me, I seem to have a very selective way of reading articles.)

  • Nancy S. Collins commented on the article "The Language of Auto Emblems"

    I thought that the word used for an emblematic car logo is a "marque" pronounced "mark", yes?

  • Nancy S. Collins commented on the article "An Instructor of Concern"

    I thought that the word used for an emblematic car logo is a "marque" pronounced "mark", yes?

  • Nancy S. Collins commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=2590"

    I thought that the word used for an emblematic car logo is a "marque" pronounced "mark", yes?

  • Nancy S. Collins commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=1746"

    This is so cool. Visualizing technology has been a craft of designers for years, thanks for pointing this out.

  • Nancy S. Collins commented on the article "http://staging.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=2901"

    There was a bald-headed guy in the late 1970s who was commisioned to re-design the subway map and visual system, we interviewed him for an advertising show for the Joseloff Gallery, Hartford Art School, in 1976. The designer was a friend of the dean of the art school, Bernard Hanson. Bernard, or "Buck" as he was known, was a very interesting and flamboyant character, he drew big-ticket NYC artists to teach there, such as David Salle and Sandy Skoglund. My buddy and I were the only designers who ever went through the school's MFA program. I may have some pictures from the exhibit. According to my memory, the work the designer did was undone a couple of years later, does this ring a bell? His name was Jim McWilliams, I think. (If this was covered in the article, forgive me, I seem to have a very selective way of reading articles.)

  • Nancy S. Collins commented on the article "The Language of Auto Emblems"

    I thought that the word used for an emblematic car logo is a "marque" pronounced "mark", yes?

  • Nancy S. Collins commented on the article "An Instructor of Concern"

    I thought that the word used for an emblematic car logo is a "marque" pronounced "mark", yes?

  • Nancy S. Collins commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=2590"

    I thought that the word used for an emblematic car logo is a "marque" pronounced "mark", yes?

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