Mr. Peter P. Bella, Jr

Member Since February 2004
Member Type Contributor
AIGA Chapter Indianapolis
Title Assistant Professor
Company Indiana University Purdue University Fort Wayne
Email moc.liamg@rjallebp
Website www.peterbella.com
Portfolio Site www.peterbella.com
Field Educator
Design/Graphic design
Bio

I’m a design educator through the art of visual communication and graphic design and have enjoyed an enthusiastic and dynamic career as a graphic designer over the past 15 years. With my professional design work primarily in academia I have had an opportunity to appreciate the higher education learning environment.

»

When it comes to the relationship between form and content in current graphic design perspectives, I feel strongly that we once lived in a world where graphic design was about the form of the communication. Meaning, what form does it take; as in form follows function. As that is still true I also feel that today it is much more. In current graphic design the designer needs to consider not only the form and the content, but also the context in which we are designing. Factors such as socioeconomics, education, psychographics, etc. are just as meaningful in design, as typography, grid structure, imagery, color, and so forth. Simply, design can create a purposeful creation of value in society.

»

Mies Van Der Rohe was known for the famous quote, “Less is more.” To quote Stefan Sagmeister, “Complaining is silly. Either act or forget.” It is my time to act. I realize that there is a limited time to share wisdom with others the further we travel along the road of life. Therefore, with less time each day, my goal is to give more to those seeking to learn and experience design.

»

In closing, a message of my own conception that I always share with students, “I’d rather shoot for the stars and land on the moon; than reach for the mountain tops and settle in the foothills.”

»

Now is my time to give back. Imagine what we can dream…

  • Peter Bella commented on the article "AIGA | Justified and Unjustified: AIGA competitions 2012"

    As a design educator and professional I recall first seeing the Justified competition eligibility guidelines—I was shocked and discouraged to become involved. The fact that I could not encourage my design students to become involved was also discouraging. Young designers and student designers look to the AIGA as a role model and mentor as they continue their growth as professionals. Paula Scher gave us this to think about in her article AIGA: Unjustified — Imprint-The Online Community for Graphic Designers, “While clients enjoy finding out that something they were involved in won a competition, they never make business decisions based on that and will more often than not state that they are not in business to win awards. If the hope here is that a client will see actual proof that a specific design made money for a business, and if that client is, indeed, impressed by it, then the likely outcome is that the client will want to replicate the very same thing with adjustments to suit their particular circumstances.” The discussion thus far strikes a cord with the First Things First Manifesto from 1964. The first line from the manifesto reads as such, “We, the undersigned, are graphic designers, photographers and students who have been brought up in a world in which the techniques and apparatus of advertising have persistently been presented to us as the most lucrative, effective and desirable means of using our talents.” I would agree with Paula Scher that the idea of “justifying” design solutions that reflect successful profit for business/corporation does not reflect a professional understanding of great design. The same discourse is apparent in the First Things First Manifesto of 2000. It is discussed with additional purpose, “We propose a reversal of priorities in favor of more useful, lasting and democratic forms of communication - a mindshift away from product marketing and toward the exploration and production of a new kind of meaning.” We need to always be aware of our intent and how we communicate our intent. After all communication is at the heart of our profession as much as the visual. With that said I feel the “Justified” concept has concerns that start simply with the name itself and further complicates its intent with the criteria. Here’s what I do know. The AIGA has some of the most creative and brillant minds in our industry and we will come to a resolution. My favorite thing about being a member of AIGA is that we’re able to speak freely about our perspectives and they’re recognized professionally. We discuss all concerns with pride and passion as our goal is to advance design as a professional craft, strategic tool and vital cultural force.

  • Peter Bella commented on the article "AIGA | Justified and Unjustified: AIGA competitions 2012"

    As a design educator and professional I recall first seeing the Justified competition eligibility guidelines—I was shocked and discouraged to become involved. The fact that I could not encourage my design students to become involved was also discouraging. Young designers and student designers look to the AIGA as a role model and mentor as they continue their growth as professionals. Paula Scher gave us this to think about in her article AIGA: Unjustified — Imprint-The Online Community for Graphic Designers, “While clients enjoy finding out that something they were involved in won a competition, they never make business decisions based on that and will more often than not state that they are not in business to win awards. If the hope here is that a client will see actual proof that a specific design made money for a business, and if that client is, indeed, impressed by it, then the likely outcome is that the client will want to replicate the very same thing with adjustments to suit their particular circumstances.” The discussion thus far strikes a cord with the First Things First Manifesto from 1964. The first line from the manifesto reads as such, “We, the undersigned, are graphic designers, photographers and students who have been brought up in a world in which the techniques and apparatus of advertising have persistently been presented to us as the most lucrative, effective and desirable means of using our talents.” I would agree with Paula Scher that the idea of “justifying” design solutions that reflect successful profit for business/corporation does not reflect a professional understanding of great design. The same discourse is apparent in the First Things First Manifesto of 2000. It is discussed with additional purpose, “We propose a reversal of priorities in favor of more useful, lasting and democratic forms of communication - a mindshift away from product marketing and toward the exploration and production of a new kind of meaning.” We need to always be aware of our intent and how we communicate our intent. After all communication is at the heart of our profession as much as the visual. With that said I feel the “Justified” concept has concerns that start simply with the name itself and further complicates its intent with the criteria. Here’s what I do know. The AIGA has some of the most creative and brillant minds in our industry and we will come to a resolution. My favorite thing about being a member of AIGA is that we’re able to speak freely about our perspectives and they’re recognized professionally. We discuss all concerns with pride and passion as our goal is to advance design as a professional craft, strategic tool and vital cultural force.

No articles were found.