Kenneth FitzGerald

About Me

Artist, educator, designer, and writer

Member Since May 2005
Member Type Supporter
AIGA Chapter Hampton Roads
Title Professor
Company Old Dominion University
Email ude.udo@regztifk
Website www.ephemeralstates.com
Field Educator
Bio

Kenneth FitzGerald is author of Volume: Writings on Graphic Design, Music, Art, and Culture, published by Princeton Architectural Press in 2010. He was a co-organizer of the AIGA Design Educators Community conference, "Blunt: Explicit and Graphic Design Criticism Now" in April 2013. He produced The News of the Whirled, a novel in the form of 4-issue limited-edition magazine that received awards for excellence from the American Center for Design and AIGA, and is in the collection of Goldstein Museum of Design at the University of Minnesota. As an artist, his work is included in public and private collections primarily in New England and New York, with numerous artist books in the Franklin Furnace/Museum of Modern Art/Artists Books collection. He received an MFA from Massachusetts College of Art and Design and is currently a Professor of Art at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia.

  • Kenneth authored "An Instructor of Concern"
  • Kenneth FitzGerald commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=2572"

    I would never call for anyone to be less than proud of their program or products, nor did I above. My issue is with the way, however tenuous or tangential, reference to the SVA MFA program creeps into Steve Heller articles. It looks to me a particular aspect of design practitioners turned teachers. The (understandable) (self-)promotional impulse from the former livelihood trumps considerations of balance and self-effacement that should highlight a critical article. (And, to share the love, I'd also site a prominent design web blog that, in matters academic, might best be called "Yale Observer.") An interesting aspect of the previous decade was the "dirtiness" in the formality coincident with the computer's burgeoning use (that 'grunge' stuff). In comparison, the 00s look decidedly clean. I can't imagine the movie "Helvetica" having the same resonance (or, perhaps even being made conceptually) before this decade. The other problem is using one point to describe a curve. That's inadequate research when used to support a contention about a decade of design activity. Once again, I acknowledge that what Steve describes is a relevant thread—but hardly an encompassing movement. I called for, and offered, a more comprehensive label. "Triumph of the Neo-Conservatives" does this, as it isn't formality-specific, and describes what I, of course, regard as an undeniable decade-long reaction to all that 90s profession-centric challenging. It gathers Steve's expression and the "clean" movement I outlined above. I know that many designers I'd consider "Neo-Conservative" would rankle at being associated with a loathed political doctrine. To be less bristly, I also offer "The Decade of Diffuse Design," to echo Steve and keep the alliteration (something I'm overly fond of). I don't see a reigning formality out there: you can argue a "clean, "dirty," or "murky," with equal conviction, depending on the cherries that look appealing. I qualify for "pundit" status? Does that come with any certification?

  • Kenneth FitzGerald commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=2572"

    I would never call for anyone to be less than proud of their program or products, nor did I above. My issue is with the way, however tenuous or tangential, reference to the SVA MFA program creeps into Steve Heller articles. It looks to me a particular aspect of design practitioners turned teachers. The (understandable) (self-)promotional impulse from the former livelihood trumps considerations of balance and self-effacement that should highlight a critical article. (And, to share the love, I'd also site a prominent design web blog that, in matters academic, might best be called "Yale Observer.") An interesting aspect of the previous decade was the "dirtiness" in the formality coincident with the computer's burgeoning use (that 'grunge' stuff). In comparison, the 00s look decidedly clean. I can't imagine the movie "Helvetica" having the same resonance (or, perhaps even being made conceptually) before this decade. The other problem is using one point to describe a curve. That's inadequate research when used to support a contention about a decade of design activity. Once again, I acknowledge that what Steve describes is a relevant thread—but hardly an encompassing movement. I called for, and offered, a more comprehensive label. "Triumph of the Neo-Conservatives" does this, as it isn't formality-specific, and describes what I, of course, regard as an undeniable decade-long reaction to all that 90s profession-centric challenging. It gathers Steve's expression and the "clean" movement I outlined above. I know that many designers I'd consider "Neo-Conservative" would rankle at being associated with a loathed political doctrine. To be less bristly, I also offer "The Decade of Diffuse Design," to echo Steve and keep the alliteration (something I'm overly fond of). I don't see a reigning formality out there: you can argue a "clean, "dirty," or "murky," with equal conviction, depending on the cherries that look appealing. I qualify for "pundit" status? Does that come with any certification?