Ms. Laura Gannarelli

About Me

Design is powerful, and the process is exciting. I love to make the complicated understandable.

Member Since June 1998
Member Type Contributor
AIGA Chapter Chicago
Title Creative Director/Principal
Company G2 Graphics
Email moc.liamg@illerannagl
Portfolio Site www.behance.net/gannarelli
Field Art direction/Creative direction
Design/Graphic design
Design management
Bio

My passion has always been to create an emotional connection through strong concepts expressed through the integration of content, typography and image in meaningful and relevant ways, allowing clients to discover how their organization relates to their lives and aspirations. When you reach your audience on an emotional level, they are more likely to become advocates of the brand. 

Whether it's a refresh of a brand from the ground up or taking what someone has and giving it a fresh spin. I understand the unique challenges and opportunities that nonprofits face. I know how to maximize a budget as well as to guide organizations through the ever-changing world of marketing. Clients have told me: "You are a designer with a marketing brain; it's a rare mix." I bring this to every project.

  • Lgannarelli commented on the article "Q&A with Sharon Werner"

    I liked her last comment about "design that's smart, serves a purpose and looks great." I have worked with many young designers and many are more what I view as "production artists" than my definition of a graphic designer. When people ask me what I do for a living...I tell them "I'm a visual problem solver." Many young designers think cool backgrounds, funky layers etc., will make the work great, but they don't have solid concepts on the layout and don't have a point of view that the reader should walk away with. I always try to break it down for them, explain why certain design moves are made and what to keep in mind. Whenever I give my input on designs to younger designers, I feel it's my role to educate them. Schools are outputting production artists, not designers and I hope it will swing the other way and they must understand graphic design is a business. You get a box of stuff, and you have to make it work. That's a tough challenge. It's like getting a box of "mystery ingredients" like Master Chef and you can only work with those ingredients to create a best dish. That's the challenge and the reward.

  • Lgannarelli commented on the article "Q&A with Sharon Werner"

    I liked her last comment about "design that's smart, serves a purpose and looks great." I have worked with many young designers and many are more what I view as "production artists" than my definition of a graphic designer. When people ask me what I do for a living...I tell them "I'm a visual problem solver." Many young designers think cool backgrounds, funky layers etc., will make the work great, but they don't have solid concepts on the layout and don't have a point of view that the reader should walk away with. I always try to break it down for them, explain why certain design moves are made and what to keep in mind. Whenever I give my input on designs to younger designers, I feel it's my role to educate them. Schools are outputting production artists, not designers and I hope it will swing the other way and they must understand graphic design is a business. You get a box of stuff, and you have to make it work. That's a tough challenge. It's like getting a box of "mystery ingredients" like Master Chef and you can only work with those ingredients to create a best dish. That's the challenge and the reward.

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