Mr. Robert D. Walker, Jr

Member Type Non-member
  • Robert Walker commented on the article "Racial Justice by Design"

    You are so true, Rodney. The lack of diversity in the profession is very sad and honestly I don't see that ever changing no matter how talented we are. I do hope and pray that the few will be the example to show the way that all designers are creative.

  • Robert Walker commented on the article "Racial Justice by Design"

    Thank you Ashleigh for your response and I thank AIGA for this platform! I don't have a problem discussing race personally or professionally, as long as, the dialogue is constructive and mutual respect. I do apologize the the comment, but being a Southern it's difficult to ignore some of the blatant racism even in 2016. Or the new form of it anyway. And not all caucasians are racist or portray bigotry. My manager at the company I work for has show more love and unity in our profession that I have ever seen. He's always teaching and nurturing his designers no matter the color. I appreciate him and I treat him as family. What's funny today we went to lunch and these two caucasian men from Richmond, VA stopped by our table. I knew what was about to come out their mouth and sure enough that made these side racial comments. My manager looked at me and I told him after they left. Now, you have a sample of what it was like growing up black in the South.

  • Robert Walker commented on the article "Racial Justice by Design"

    Hello, Ashleigh. There wasn't any profanity nor inappropriate language that would trigger it to be Spam. It's factual. It's my life story as an African American designer. It happened to me..lol. I can provide to you what I commented.

  • Robert Walker commented on the article "Racial Justice by Design"

    Why was my comment detected as "Spam"? You all can't handle the TRUTH on this subject, but yet you wish to create this platform.

  • Robert Walker commented on the article "Racial Justice by Design"

    As to the designer Clay Davis response, this is a perfect example of what's wrong in this country for centuries. I am an African American designer and many of my white counterparts and white people in society doesn't have a clue to what it is like waking up black in America. They think what is being portrayed on television is a true definition of who we are and don't bother to entertain the notion of understanding the plight of African American, but rather toss to the side as another complaint by African Americans. Even as a designer, I face discrimination and the inability to grow and elevate in this profession. How many African Americans can any of you say works in your design firms, creative houses, in-house corporate marketing departments? And how many have you EVEN attempted to hire? Everywhere I look around in this profession at these great design firms there is no one of color. MY COLOR. So, much white snow it becomes white noise that blocks out the cries of African American to be even considered on the level of our counterparts. We work hard and do all of the things that many of our contemporaries do and don't get the title nor the money. They want you to wait your turn and pay your dues. I've paid my dues and looking for back pay. You want a story AIGA. I'll give you one. First year in grad school at The Savannah College of Art and Design. I am from Georgia, born and raised. I was coming from class one night and these white guys in a pickup truck drives by with a Georgia confederate flag yelling out the N word to me. And another instance, I have been called N word to my face by another white person. I thought to myself, do they not know I attend one of the premier art schools in the Southeast, let alone in this city? Doesn't my art supplies in my hand give off that I am a student? But my skin color was screaming loud and clear. So, until people admit that we have a generational problem regarding to race that has been passed down from family to family, then we will continue to not coexist. You can continue to sweep it under the rug and ignore it as a black problem that's fine. Just don't get upset when African Americans calls out the injustice that you fail to realize. Honestly, I don't like speaking about race especially growing up in the South.

  • Robert Walker commented on the article "Where are the Black Designers?"

    As a black designer, I think what's lacking is proper teaching and nurturing of our talented black designers on the college levels. how many of our professors actually care about the progression and growth of our designers by providing them current resources, knowledgeable industry standards and new trends? as a graduate of an HBCU, it is even more lacking. i feel that many of the black designers don't even reach out to our own, but rather cater to other races. we have a responsibility to guide them in this profession, in order for them to compete.

  • Robert Walker commented on the article "Racial Justice by Design"

    You are so true, Rodney. The lack of diversity in the profession is very sad and honestly I don't see that ever changing no matter how talented we are. I do hope and pray that the few will be the example to show the way that all designers are creative.

  • Robert Walker commented on the article "Racial Justice by Design"

    Thank you Ashleigh for your response and I thank AIGA for this platform! I don't have a problem discussing race personally or professionally, as long as, the dialogue is constructive and mutual respect. I do apologize the the comment, but being a Southern it's difficult to ignore some of the blatant racism even in 2016. Or the new form of it anyway. And not all caucasians are racist or portray bigotry. My manager at the company I work for has show more love and unity in our profession that I have ever seen. He's always teaching and nurturing his designers no matter the color. I appreciate him and I treat him as family. What's funny today we went to lunch and these two caucasian men from Richmond, VA stopped by our table. I knew what was about to come out their mouth and sure enough that made these side racial comments. My manager looked at me and I told him after they left. Now, you have a sample of what it was like growing up black in the South.

  • Robert Walker commented on the article "Racial Justice by Design"

    Hello, Ashleigh. There wasn't any profanity nor inappropriate language that would trigger it to be Spam. It's factual. It's my life story as an African American designer. It happened to me..lol. I can provide to you what I commented.

  • Robert Walker commented on the article "Racial Justice by Design"

    Why was my comment detected as "Spam"? You all can't handle the TRUTH on this subject, but yet you wish to create this platform.

  • Robert Walker commented on the article "Racial Justice by Design"

    As to the designer Clay Davis response, this is a perfect example of what's wrong in this country for centuries. I am an African American designer and many of my white counterparts and white people in society doesn't have a clue to what it is like waking up black in America. They think what is being portrayed on television is a true definition of who we are and don't bother to entertain the notion of understanding the plight of African American, but rather toss to the side as another complaint by African Americans. Even as a designer, I face discrimination and the inability to grow and elevate in this profession. How many African Americans can any of you say works in your design firms, creative houses, in-house corporate marketing departments? And how many have you EVEN attempted to hire? Everywhere I look around in this profession at these great design firms there is no one of color. MY COLOR. So, much white snow it becomes white noise that blocks out the cries of African American to be even considered on the level of our counterparts. We work hard and do all of the things that many of our contemporaries do and don't get the title nor the money. They want you to wait your turn and pay your dues. I've paid my dues and looking for back pay. You want a story AIGA. I'll give you one. First year in grad school at The Savannah College of Art and Design. I am from Georgia, born and raised. I was coming from class one night and these white guys in a pickup truck drives by with a Georgia confederate flag yelling out the N word to me. And another instance, I have been called N word to my face by another white person. I thought to myself, do they not know I attend one of the premier art schools in the Southeast, let alone in this city? Doesn't my art supplies in my hand give off that I am a student? But my skin color was screaming loud and clear. So, until people admit that we have a generational problem regarding to race that has been passed down from family to family, then we will continue to not coexist. You can continue to sweep it under the rug and ignore it as a black problem that's fine. Just don't get upset when African Americans calls out the injustice that you fail to realize. Honestly, I don't like speaking about race especially growing up in the South.

  • Robert Walker commented on the article "Where are the Black Designers?"

    As a black designer, I think what's lacking is proper teaching and nurturing of our talented black designers on the college levels. how many of our professors actually care about the progression and growth of our designers by providing them current resources, knowledgeable industry standards and new trends? as a graduate of an HBCU, it is even more lacking. i feel that many of the black designers don't even reach out to our own, but rather cater to other races. we have a responsibility to guide them in this profession, in order for them to compete.

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