Ambrose Cheuk-Wing Li

Member Since April 2011
Member Type Contributor
AIGA Chapter International
Email moc.liamg@il.esorbma
Website incd.ambroseli.ca
Portfolio Site port.ambroseli.ca
Field Design/Graphic design
Web development
Illustration design
Bio

I am a recent graduate from OCAD (Ontario College of Art and Design University) in Toronto, Canada.

 

Most of the work in my online portfolio came from before my studies at OCAD when I was working in-house as a graphic designer at a local non-profit. I’d greatly appreciate any feedback you may have on any piece in my portfolio.

  • Ambrose updated a project on Behance.
    Zombie blue aardvarks and the New Year Please do not harm the plants! Illustrations from my display at GradEx Illustrated posters, 2014
  • Ambrose updated a project on Behance.
    Cadmium, January 2014 issue Conference wayfinding signage Blind Reading Christmas card
  • Ambrose updated a project on Behance.
    face2face postcard cccgt.org Music festival Wedding invitation, program & favour
  • Ambrose updated a project on Behance.
    Sculpture exhibition – environmental graphic design Conference program Photo exhibition – environmental graphic design
  • Ambrose Li commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=11469"

    I actually quite like purple (not as much as orange, I suppose), but no, I don’t associate it with bravery. Anyway, I think “Here, it seems as if the generic idea of the color ‘purple’ is not liked by most men, but the association of a Purple Heart medal with bravery and courage puts the color into a different context, and changes their response to it.” might be the key here; i.e., (sub)culture might be more important than genes. (I definitely disagree with the view that genetics is the reason why “while men tend to see ‘just red,’ women see a much wider range of colors”. Back when I did plastic models I didn’t see blue or green, or indeed red, but could name the specific shade of colour that the paint manufacturers named them; I no longer can, and I strongly doubt my genetics has changed.) With respect to cultural influences on colour perception, a few months ago I happened to run into this video (by way of Aprille Best Glover’s “Introduction to Artistic Intelligence” project, which I didn’t participate in but followed along), which I think shows the significance of it in an even stronger (or should we say an entirely different) light: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4b71rT9fU-I

  • Ambrose Li commented on the article "What the Book"

    I think none of the three stated qualities touches on what makes ebooks appealing: search. I love physical books, but I have a hard time searching through them. With ebooks, however, searching is easy. The major downside of ebooks is DRM, that is, the lack of a perception of security. The publisher is in control; You are not. Essentially, the fundamental assumption of DRM is that everyone must be declared a criminal without trial. And what if the DRM software malfunctions? What if my computer breaks down? What if something got hacked and I lose access? What if the publisher folds? With a physical book, if I lose it I have no one but myself to blame; with an ebook I WILL blame the publisher even before I contemplate “buying” it.

  • Ambrose Li commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3082&id=8771"

    I have to say either aiga.org’s redesign was visionary, or the folks at Facebook has looked to AIGA as their inspiration. I just found out that Facebook has adopted the same “content on the left with narrow columns on the right” approach. I still find the new site cluttered and hard to follow, but it seems that at least we are not alone any more.

  • Ambrose Li commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3080&id=11469"

    I actually quite like purple (not as much as orange, I suppose), but no, I don’t associate it with bravery. Anyway, I think “Here, it seems as if the generic idea of the color ‘purple’ is not liked by most men, but the association of a Purple Heart medal with bravery and courage puts the color into a different context, and changes their response to it.” might be the key here; i.e., (sub)culture might be more important than genes. (I definitely disagree with the view that genetics is the reason why “while men tend to see ‘just red,’ women see a much wider range of colors”. Back when I did plastic models I didn’t see blue or green, or indeed red, but could name the specific shade of colour that the paint manufacturers named them; I no longer can, and I strongly doubt my genetics has changed.) With respect to cultural influences on colour perception, a few months ago I happened to run into this video (by way of Aprille Best Glover’s “Introduction to Artistic Intelligence” project, which I didn’t participate in but followed along), which I think shows the significance of it in an even stronger (or should we say an entirely different) light: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4b71rT9fU-I

  • Ambrose Li commented on the article "What the Book"

    I think none of the three stated qualities touches on what makes ebooks appealing: search. I love physical books, but I have a hard time searching through them. With ebooks, however, searching is easy. The major downside of ebooks is DRM, that is, the lack of a perception of security. The publisher is in control; You are not. Essentially, the fundamental assumption of DRM is that everyone must be declared a criminal without trial. And what if the DRM software malfunctions? What if my computer breaks down? What if something got hacked and I lose access? What if the publisher folds? With a physical book, if I lose it I have no one but myself to blame; with an ebook I WILL blame the publisher even before I contemplate “buying” it.

  • Ambrose Li commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3082&id=8771"

    I have to say either aiga.org’s redesign was visionary, or the folks at Facebook has looked to AIGA as their inspiration. I just found out that Facebook has adopted the same “content on the left with narrow columns on the right” approach. I still find the new site cluttered and hard to follow, but it seems that at least we are not alone any more.

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