Sue B. Runyon

Member Since June 2000
Member Type Contributor
AIGA Chapter Jacksonville
Title Graphic Design
Email moc.brepeus@eus
Portfolio Site www.sueperb.com
Field Design/Graphic design
Art direction/Creative direction
Brand and identity
Bio

With over 20 years of graphic design experience, I develop impactful and flexible marketing materials to build brand awareness and enhance campaign effectiveness.

Know-hows: Brand identity, logos, email marketing, direct mail, brochures, Web design, CMS, CSS, tradeshow and booth graphics, photography, Illustration, and public speaking.

  • Sue updated a project on Behance.
    The Art of "Thinking" Diagrams San Jose Church of Christ Website EverBank Field; Sea Best Concessions Community Annual Report
  • Sue Barrett Runyon commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3079&id=2140"

    I worked as a graphic design contractor for 10 years both in-house as a temp and on a per-job basis. Recently I was hired full-time with a large data base services corporation in their in-house marketing department. The first two things that stood out to me after two months on the job, I believe you hit the nail right on the head, and were well stated in your article as follows: 1. "In-house teams that have the advantage of a more planned mission often find themselves devolving into glorified production houses... Comment: I am shocked at the last minute mentality of the upper management to make a request for power point presentations or 40-60 page programs for large client conferences or "Investor Days" without any apparent understanding of the importance of concept and design. It is as if design has no bearing on the bottom line—which is profit of course. A well thought out concept for a project has to be better than a piece-meal group of individual task requests from different management departments. Question #1. How do we educate upper management as to the PROFITABILITY a creative department can give to a corporation? 2. "There's corporate inertia and stagnation—the, 'we've always done it this way,' syndrome that paralyzes growth and quashes any vision a design group might have for moving beyond its current situation." Comment: I can't tell you how many times I've heard the phrase, "we've always done it this way," in just two months time. I am willing to be patient on this one. But a lot of time and money were spent on the job search for this positon, and for what? This comapny could pay a lot less to someone qualified to be a "yes" person. The impression often times in a job interview is that a department is looking for fresh ideas when in reality the are simply in need of catching up on an overload of work. Question #2. What are some of your more successful experiences with changing the traditional approach of the creative job process within an already well established marketing department?

  • Sue Barrett Runyon commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3079&id=2140"

    I worked as a graphic design contractor for 10 years both in-house as a temp and on a per-job basis. Recently I was hired full-time with a large data base services corporation in their in-house marketing department. The first two things that stood out to me after two months on the job, I believe you hit the nail right on the head, and were well stated in your article as follows: 1. "In-house teams that have the advantage of a more planned mission often find themselves devolving into glorified production houses... Comment: I am shocked at the last minute mentality of the upper management to make a request for power point presentations or 40-60 page programs for large client conferences or "Investor Days" without any apparent understanding of the importance of concept and design. It is as if design has no bearing on the bottom line—which is profit of course. A well thought out concept for a project has to be better than a piece-meal group of individual task requests from different management departments. Question #1. How do we educate upper management as to the PROFITABILITY a creative department can give to a corporation? 2. "There's corporate inertia and stagnation—the, 'we've always done it this way,' syndrome that paralyzes growth and quashes any vision a design group might have for moving beyond its current situation." Comment: I can't tell you how many times I've heard the phrase, "we've always done it this way," in just two months time. I am willing to be patient on this one. But a lot of time and money were spent on the job search for this positon, and for what? This comapny could pay a lot less to someone qualified to be a "yes" person. The impression often times in a job interview is that a department is looking for fresh ideas when in reality the are simply in need of catching up on an overload of work. Question #2. What are some of your more successful experiences with changing the traditional approach of the creative job process within an already well established marketing department?

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