Carolyn Crowley

Member Since September 1996
Member Type Sustaining
AIGA Chapter Vermont
Title Creative Director
Company CC Graphic Design & Discovery Gateway children's museum
Email moc.oidutsngisedcihpargcc@nylorac
Website www.ccgraphicdesignstudio.com
Portfolio Site www.behance.net/carolyncrowley
Field Art direction/Creative direction
Advertising
Environmental design
Bio

Versatile problem-solver, designer, and manager with expertise in print, digital, and environmental graphic design. 15+ years designing and managing award-winning projects for a variety of museums, design firms, and businesses throughout the United States. Focus on museums, children's products, education, and projects that make my soul dance.

  • Carolyn updated a project on Behance.
    Making Music Exhibit Graphics & Visual Identity Museum Donor Wall AIGA Vermont Membership Graphics AIGA VT Design Awards Logo & Identity
  • Carolyn updated a project on Behance.
    Holiday Cards Gender Equality Starts Early Children’s Festival Planetarium New Horizons Gala Invite
  • Carolyn updated a project on Behance.
    Sensory Room & Social Story Corner Exhibit A Star Shines the Brightest Gala Event Planetarium Special Donor Materials Logos
  • Carolyn updated a project on Behance.
    Bumble Bee Bash Annual Fundraiser Invitation National Track and Field Hall of Fame Children's Museum Entrance Redesign From the Ground Up Exhibition
  • Carolyn updated a project on Behance.
    Children’s Museum Kids Campaign Museum Collateral Redesign Museum Founder's Wall
  • Carolyn Crowley commented on the article "Nickelodeon’s in-house design goes multidisciplinary"

    Bravo In-House Nickelodeon Creative Team! As a parent and designer for children's museums and products, I have been a long-time admirer and fan. Thanks for keeping the great work going.

  • Carolyn Crowley commented on the article "A movement to make internships fairer"

    I agree that businesses and organizations should be reviewing the law and doing what's fair to make sure these aspiring, earnest and hard-working people are not exploited. However, as someone who did 4 unpaid internships before graduating college and as someone who has began internship programs at both for-profit and non-profit companies over my career, I really believe in unpaid internships. Most in-house design departments and even a lot of agencies just don't have the funds for this. You often have to invest in equipment, software, and it's a lot of my time. If unpaid internships became illegal, we will not see a surge of businesses offering paid internships. We will see no internships. As a student, the opportunity to go to design firms, inhouse departments was so incredibly valuable--to watch how it all operates, how to design for someone else besides yourself, to know what type of design I wanted to do, to get real pieces for my portfolio, to make mistakes. There is no other experience that can replicate this. I got a job right out of college and many other designers I know, did not. Also I usually try to make sure the student is getting credit with their design program. When you do that, there is work on your part as their mentor to write up progress reports and report to the internship director. (Again more time that I don't get paid for.) But their work is so much better and they are invested. Also at the museum I work for we do outline the specific law above and agree on a specific timeframe--usually 3 months, 10 hrs/week--and both parties sign. I encourage students to stop thinking of being paid as an entitlement and see the benefits of these experiences. If the company does not bring an agreement like the above for you to sign--keep the experience limited to 3 months, remind them of the law, and try to tie it in with credit for your degree.

  • Carolyn Crowley commented on the article "Cultivating design thinking in kids"

    I would also like to suggest that local design chapters partner with their local children's museum as a way to bring design education to children of all ages, from public to private to home-schooled children from a variety of backgrounds. Children's museums have the expertise in child development and art education for different age groups... and often already have the audiences set up. This has been successful partnership with AIGA Salt Lake City and Discovery Gateway: The Children's Museum of Utah for over the past couple of years. Our collaborations have included exhibits and workshops on recycling and reusing, designing fun every day items like halloween bags and tinkertoy structures, to extending AIGA's SLC's Revinylize initiative with having Bag-designing and wallet-designing workshops with the Museum's old vinyl banners. There is still more to be done but a great start to the design discussion in the community.

  • Carolyn Crowley commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3079&id=2140"

    First, Andy, fantastic articles. Thank you for such great advice on behalf of innies every where. I'm curious, how would and/or would you customize the above advice for the in-house designer that is the only designer and is not part of a group of creatives? Creating a mission statement and capabilities brochure seems a little over the top in that situation.

  • Carolyn Crowley commented on the article "http://staging.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3079&id=2139"

    As a design professional for 12 years, it took me 10 years to actually find out that there was this perceived difference between an in-house designer and design agency designers. I've worked in-house and for agencies and I guess never experienced these 2 worlds crossing paths. The first time was 2 years ago where the museum I work for has had to hire a couple different agencies for really large jobs we couldn't do in-house. Unfortunately it seems the disrespect always comes from the agency side in how they are never open to my feedback and have even gone as far as to make my employer question my ideas and opinions. I'm really disappointed in the agency world. Are there any good/fun agencies out there without immense egos? And what happened to good designers just being good designers?

  • Carolyn Crowley commented on the article "Nickelodeon’s in-house design goes multidisciplinary"

    Bravo In-House Nickelodeon Creative Team! As a parent and designer for children's museums and products, I have been a long-time admirer and fan. Thanks for keeping the great work going.

  • Carolyn Crowley commented on the article "A movement to make internships fairer"

    I agree that businesses and organizations should be reviewing the law and doing what's fair to make sure these aspiring, earnest and hard-working people are not exploited. However, as someone who did 4 unpaid internships before graduating college and as someone who has began internship programs at both for-profit and non-profit companies over my career, I really believe in unpaid internships. Most in-house design departments and even a lot of agencies just don't have the funds for this. You often have to invest in equipment, software, and it's a lot of my time. If unpaid internships became illegal, we will not see a surge of businesses offering paid internships. We will see no internships. As a student, the opportunity to go to design firms, inhouse departments was so incredibly valuable--to watch how it all operates, how to design for someone else besides yourself, to know what type of design I wanted to do, to get real pieces for my portfolio, to make mistakes. There is no other experience that can replicate this. I got a job right out of college and many other designers I know, did not. Also I usually try to make sure the student is getting credit with their design program. When you do that, there is work on your part as their mentor to write up progress reports and report to the internship director. (Again more time that I don't get paid for.) But their work is so much better and they are invested. Also at the museum I work for we do outline the specific law above and agree on a specific timeframe--usually 3 months, 10 hrs/week--and both parties sign. I encourage students to stop thinking of being paid as an entitlement and see the benefits of these experiences. If the company does not bring an agreement like the above for you to sign--keep the experience limited to 3 months, remind them of the law, and try to tie it in with credit for your degree.

  • Carolyn Crowley commented on the article "Cultivating design thinking in kids"

    I would also like to suggest that local design chapters partner with their local children's museum as a way to bring design education to children of all ages, from public to private to home-schooled children from a variety of backgrounds. Children's museums have the expertise in child development and art education for different age groups... and often already have the audiences set up. This has been successful partnership with AIGA Salt Lake City and Discovery Gateway: The Children's Museum of Utah for over the past couple of years. Our collaborations have included exhibits and workshops on recycling and reusing, designing fun every day items like halloween bags and tinkertoy structures, to extending AIGA's SLC's Revinylize initiative with having Bag-designing and wallet-designing workshops with the Museum's old vinyl banners. There is still more to be done but a great start to the design discussion in the community.

  • Carolyn Crowley commented on the article "http://www.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3079&id=2140"

    First, Andy, fantastic articles. Thank you for such great advice on behalf of innies every where. I'm curious, how would and/or would you customize the above advice for the in-house designer that is the only designer and is not part of a group of creatives? Creating a mission statement and capabilities brochure seems a little over the top in that situation.

  • Carolyn Crowley commented on the article "http://staging.aiga.org/interior.aspx?pageid=3079&id=2139"

    As a design professional for 12 years, it took me 10 years to actually find out that there was this perceived difference between an in-house designer and design agency designers. I've worked in-house and for agencies and I guess never experienced these 2 worlds crossing paths. The first time was 2 years ago where the museum I work for has had to hire a couple different agencies for really large jobs we couldn't do in-house. Unfortunately it seems the disrespect always comes from the agency side in how they are never open to my feedback and have even gone as far as to make my employer question my ideas and opinions. I'm really disappointed in the agency world. Are there any good/fun agencies out there without immense egos? And what happened to good designers just being good designers?

No articles were found.