Mr. Andrew D. Bass, Jr.

About Me

Proud Trek geek, passionate about design and creativity, video game enthusiast.

Member Since January 2004
Member Type Contributor
AIGA Chapter New York
Title Design Strategist
Company Straight Design
Email moc.ngisedt8rts@werdna
Website www.str8tdesign.com
Portfolio Site www.str8tdesign.com
Field Design/Graphic design
Brand and identity
Web design
Bio

Straight Design LLC is visual solutions made simple and direct. My freelance design consultancy's mission is to create engaging, visual strategies for small to mid-size businesses and non-profits. It's that mission that has resulted in producing award-winning work in brand and identity, publication, web and communication design for various clientele.

  • drewdesign66 commented on the article "Where are the Black Designers?"

    For SB and of similar thinking… "Focus on skills and ability" is always the retort until you have a designer with skills/ability and then the focus switches to something else creating another hoop to jump through. I've been working as a designer for 26 years and this statement never changes when it comes to the lack of designers of color. It seems to me that the when this issue of underrepresentation is brought up, the majority takes it as meaning "just hire some brown people regardless of whether they can do the job or not. We just need this to go away, i.e. quotas." Creating equal consideration and representation takes nothing away from the obvious fact that skill and ability must be there. Let take the example of women in design. Is the push for more women in the industry at all levels is just another quota cry? Do you believe folks who are advocating for this are not concerned about skill and ability? Is there any validity in this cause? Is that cause not the same as wanting more racial representation in an industry you practice in? In my years of practicing design, I've become accustomed to being the lone creative who happens to be black. It still is an uncomfortable situation in 2015 as it was starting out in 1989. Inevitably, the majority folks try to relate to me as "a black man who designs" instead of just a man who designs. I get the stupid slang conversations that I refuse to participate in, to the stereotypical suggestions if a project is targeting a multi-cultural audience to the shocked looks upon meeting potential clients/employers for the first time and they see that I'm black. I even had someone tell me that they thought I was white based on my typography work. What!? Having a diversified team is not about pandering to appear PC. It's about assembling the best team, with the best ideas for the success of the project. Different views help expand the creative toolshed as well as avoid embarrassing and offensive solutions from seeing the light of day. Unfortunately, this rather simple idea seems to stick in America's side because it falls into a power position, plain and simple. Imagery is power. Creativity is power. Folks who have the power are less inclined to share. Madison Avenue has and continues to be a shining example of how the lack of diversity (in race, gender and orientation) creates a monolithic, insular industry. The folks advocating for diversity is NOT about trying to demonize the white male (real talk—that's the majority in the creative field) but rather creating a more realistic and inclusive field that moves us all to a higher creative plane.

  • drewdesign66 commented on the article "Where are the Black Designers?"

    Excellent presentation Maurice! Excellent! I was at that '91 AIGA Symposium as a recent grad and remember the beginnings of the mentor program AIGA started. Two of my fellow Pratt grads joined me in the program. I've always felt that was one of the best things that came out of that symposium. In 2015, it's disheartening to still be having this conversation but what's especially troubling is the mindset that this is such a non-issue. The lack of empathy or understanding from some in the industry is mind-blowing. One thing I have always heard back then and still now is that "we can't find any talented designers of color. If they were there, we'd hire them." Really? That statement has always spoken volumes. Talent has to be acknowledged and recognized across the board—otherwise, we continue creating a splintered creative community.

  • Andrew Bass commented on the article "Remembering Bill Drenttel"

    My deepest condolences to Jessica Helfand and the rest of Bill Drenttel's family. It was a shock to learn of his passing.

  • drewdesign66 commented on the article "Where are the Black Designers?"

    For SB and of similar thinking… "Focus on skills and ability" is always the retort until you have a designer with skills/ability and then the focus switches to something else creating another hoop to jump through. I've been working as a designer for 26 years and this statement never changes when it comes to the lack of designers of color. It seems to me that the when this issue of underrepresentation is brought up, the majority takes it as meaning "just hire some brown people regardless of whether they can do the job or not. We just need this to go away, i.e. quotas." Creating equal consideration and representation takes nothing away from the obvious fact that skill and ability must be there. Let take the example of women in design. Is the push for more women in the industry at all levels is just another quota cry? Do you believe folks who are advocating for this are not concerned about skill and ability? Is there any validity in this cause? Is that cause not the same as wanting more racial representation in an industry you practice in? In my years of practicing design, I've become accustomed to being the lone creative who happens to be black. It still is an uncomfortable situation in 2015 as it was starting out in 1989. Inevitably, the majority folks try to relate to me as "a black man who designs" instead of just a man who designs. I get the stupid slang conversations that I refuse to participate in, to the stereotypical suggestions if a project is targeting a multi-cultural audience to the shocked looks upon meeting potential clients/employers for the first time and they see that I'm black. I even had someone tell me that they thought I was white based on my typography work. What!? Having a diversified team is not about pandering to appear PC. It's about assembling the best team, with the best ideas for the success of the project. Different views help expand the creative toolshed as well as avoid embarrassing and offensive solutions from seeing the light of day. Unfortunately, this rather simple idea seems to stick in America's side because it falls into a power position, plain and simple. Imagery is power. Creativity is power. Folks who have the power are less inclined to share. Madison Avenue has and continues to be a shining example of how the lack of diversity (in race, gender and orientation) creates a monolithic, insular industry. The folks advocating for diversity is NOT about trying to demonize the white male (real talk—that's the majority in the creative field) but rather creating a more realistic and inclusive field that moves us all to a higher creative plane.

  • drewdesign66 commented on the article "Where are the Black Designers?"

    Excellent presentation Maurice! Excellent! I was at that '91 AIGA Symposium as a recent grad and remember the beginnings of the mentor program AIGA started. Two of my fellow Pratt grads joined me in the program. I've always felt that was one of the best things that came out of that symposium. In 2015, it's disheartening to still be having this conversation but what's especially troubling is the mindset that this is such a non-issue. The lack of empathy or understanding from some in the industry is mind-blowing. One thing I have always heard back then and still now is that "we can't find any talented designers of color. If they were there, we'd hire them." Really? That statement has always spoken volumes. Talent has to be acknowledged and recognized across the board—otherwise, we continue creating a splintered creative community.

  • Andrew Bass commented on the article "Remembering Bill Drenttel"

    My deepest condolences to Jessica Helfand and the rest of Bill Drenttel's family. It was a shock to learn of his passing.

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